Myths About Suicide

Suicide is rarely understood and frequently stigmatized. I remember when I heard about fashion designer Kate Spade’s suicide. But she was rich and famous. And she had a teenaged daughter. Why?

But the truth is, no one really knows what kind of pain another person may be in. Even if they appear to have much to live for.

Because suicide isn’t talked about enough, it is shrouded in mystery.

Suicide Myths

  • It can’t happen to my teenage child.
  • Suicides come out of the blue with little or no warning.
  • People who stop acting depressed and begin acting inexplicably happy have turned a corner and are out of danger.
  • Everyone who attempts suicide intends to die.
  • Suicides occur only in lower socio-economic groups.
  • Those who talk about suicide don’t really do it.
  • Most suicide victims had prior attempts.
  • People who have everything to live for don’t do it.
  • People who commit suicide don’t want help.
  • Once people decide to die by suicide, there is nothing you can do to stop them.
  • People who attempt suicide and survive will not attempt suicide again.
  • Only people who appear depressed attempt suicide.
  • A suicide attempt is a manipulative behavior and therefore should be ignored or even punished.
  • Depression and other mental disorders do not occur in young people.

Suicide Warning Signs

These are signs that someone maybe considering or planning to commit suicide

My father committed suicide when I was 11 years old. Even at that age, I knew that he was depressed. I felt guilty for years because I felt like I should have been able to prevent it.

I realize now that a young child cannot prevent a parent’s suicide. But it is preventable. Pay attention to your family, friends and coworkers. Don’t be afraid to intervene. You could save their life.

If someone you know is talking about or planning to take his or her life, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-TALK (8255).

Suicide: Know What to Say

From USA TODAY 
Suicide prevention experts: What you say (and don’t say) could save a person’s life 
If someone you care about is thinking about suicide, here’s what to do. *Suicide Lifeline: 800-273-8255* 

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/09/10/suicide-prevention-how-help-someone-who-suicidal/965640002/ 

Helping Others

If you are ever in a situation where someone is in crisis, this article can help prevent a suicide. But even if it isn’t that serious, taking these steps can help.

5 Action Steps for Helping Someone in Emotional Pain

In 2017, suicide claimed the lives of more than 47,000 people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Suicide affects people of all ages, genders, races, and ethnicities.

Suicide is complicated and tragic, but it can be preventable. Knowing the warning signs for suicide and how to get help can help save lives.

Here are 5 steps you can take to #BeThe1To help someone in emotional pain:

ASK: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” It’s not an easy question but studies show that asking at-risk individuals if they are suicidal does not increase suicides or suicidal thoughts.
KEEP THEM SAFE: Reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal items or places is an important part of suicide prevention. While this is not always easy, asking if the at-risk person has a plan and removing or disabling the lethal means can make a difference.
BE THERE: Listen carefully and learn what the individual is thinking and feeling. Research suggests acknowledging and talking about suicide may in fact reduce rather than increase suicidal thoughts.
HELP THEM CONNECT: Save the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s number in your phone so it’s there when you need it: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also help make a connection with a trusted individual like a family member, friend, spiritual advisor, or mental health professional.
STAY CONNECTED: Staying in touch after a crisis or after being discharged from care can make a difference. Studies have shown the number of suicide deaths goes down when someone follows up with the at-risk person.
For more information on suicide prevention: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention.

http://www.bethe1to.com